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This month's BCPL's Reading Challenge is read a book that takes place in the state or country where you were born. Here are some of our suggestions. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. You can participate in BCPL's Reading Challenge on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #Bwellread to earn prizes at the end of each month!

 

 BCPL Reading Challenge 2017 In Partnership with WBALTV

Cover art for The Accidental Tourist Cover art for Alias Grace Cover art for American Rust Cover art for Baltimore Blues Cover art for Beloved Cover art for Big Stone Gap Cover art for Bridget Jones's Diary Cover art for The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Cover art for The Camel Club Cover art for The Cooking Gene Cover art for Crazy Rich Asians Cover art for Enrique's Journey Cover art for Forbidden Cover art for Half of a Yellow Sun  Cover art for Hillbilly Elegy Cover art for Homegoing Cover art for The Johnstown Flood Cover art for The Joy Luck Club Cover art for Killers of the Flower Moon Cover art for Like Water for Chocolate Cover art for Lonesome Dove Cover art for Long Walk to Freedom Cover art for Memoirs of a Geisha Cover art for Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Cover art for The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Cover art for New People Cover art for One for the Money Cover art for The Other Wes Moore Cover art for Outcasts United Cover art for PachinkoCover art for Sea Swept Cover art for A Tree Grows in Brooklyn Cover art for Wonder Valley


 
 

Holidays Gone to the Dogs

posted by: December 4, 2017 - 3:22pm

Two things that are guaranteed heart warmers are dogs and the holidays. Together they make a winning combination in these titles perfect for seasonal reading. If you like Hallmark movies, then these books are for you!

Cover Art for Pupcakes Pupcakes by Annie England Noblin may just have the best book cover ever! Recently divorced Brydie gets a rent-free house, but it comes with a big-boned pug named Teddy Roosevelt and a weekly visit to Pauline, Teddy’s owner who is now in a nursing home.

 

Renee Richardson has a list of Christmas wishes in Sue Pethick’s The Dog Who Came for Christmas. She wants friends for her troubled young son Kieran, more clients at her salon and fewer bad dates. Little does she know that Kieran has already made a new buddy  a four-legged pal named Max.

 

Noelle by Greg Kincaid is the fourth installment of the McCray family and their lovable canines in rural Kansas and finds matriarch Mary Ann McCray determined to shake up Christmas by accepting the role as Crossing Trail's first woman Santa Claus.

 

If you love dogs, you’ll love Laurien Berenson’s mysteries. Wagging Through the Snow is the newest installment in Cover Art for Wagging Through the Snow the Melanie Travis series and lives up to expectations. Melanie is looking for a quiet time at Christmas, but when her brother buys a Christmas tree farm and a dead body turns up under a tree, her life is anything but calm.  


 
 

Between the Covers with Elizabeth Berg

posted by: November 20, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Story of Arthur Truluv My new favorite character is Arthur! The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg is an emotional story of people finding their place in the world and what family really means. Fannie Flagg writes of this powerful novel, “I dare you to read this novel and not fall in love with Arthur Truluv. His story will make you laugh and cry, and will show you a love that never ends and what it means to be truly human.” Between the Covers was lucky enough to talk to the novelist who shared her thoughts on Arthur, writing and what she’s working on next. 

 

 

Between the Covers: Arthur is kind, compassionate and funny. How did this delightful character come to you? Is he based on anyone you know?

 

Elizabeth Berg: Arthur came about because I kept seeing the image of a man sitting at the side of a grave, his wife's grave, I presumed. He was on one of those fold-up chairs and eating lunch. That's all I had when I started, as is typical for me. Most of my novels start with just a wisp of an idea. Arthur is based more on someone I wish I knew, rather than someone I do know. That said, there is a smidgen of my maternal grandfather, called Papa, in him. Papa was really loving and very funny. And a great cook, as opposed to Arthur!  

 

BTC: The Story of Arthur Truluv is also about two women at two very different places in their lives. Maddie is a pregnant teenager and Lucille is older and still hoping for love in her life. These two women are emotionally needy, yet strong. How did you create such realistic women who are coping with loss and looking to be loved?

 

EB: You know, the real answer is that my characters create themselves upon the page. They reveal themselves as I go along. I am often surprised by the way they develop, by the turns they take or the unexpected things that they say. I'll give you an example. When Maddy sees a deer, she addresses it as her mom. [She stares back at the animal, its wide and patient eyes, its stillness. Then, "Mom?" Maddy whispers.] That really surprised me. But then it made sense, in the context of Maddy having no one, really; and looking for "helpers" everywhere. Lucille just came barging onto the page, and I was happy to let her take over everything.

 

BTC: The multi-generational friendship between Arthur, Maddie and Lucille which evolves into more is so poignant. Who or what was your inspiration for this novel?

 

Elizabeth Berg (Teresa Crawford)EB: I think the inspiration was just that we are living in such difficult, anxious times, and I wanted to write something that was absolutely life-affirming. I am always attracted to little towns, and so I made the setting be a fictional small town in Missouri called Mason. I also was influenced by Our Town and by Spoon River Anthology.  

 

BTC: As with all your novels, these three characters really come to life for the reader. How do you develop such insight into human nature?

 

EB: I think insight into people comes from being really interested in them, which I am. Also, being a nurse taught me lot about what people really care about, what matters most to them.

 

BTC: Maddie, is only 18, yet you really get her. Have you ever considered writing for teens or even younger children?

 

EB: I have written crossover novels: Durable Goods, Joy School and True to Form can all be read and enjoyed by ages 12or even a mature 10and up. In fact, Durable Goods is used in a lot of eighth grade classrooms. I would love to write a picture book, but haven't tried, yet. (Except for the time I wrote and illustratedpretty badlya children's book about a dog named Ralph. It was called Ralph Anderson's Pretty Good Birthday. I never submitted it, and I have no idea where it is.)

 

BTC: What is your writing routine? Any must-have snacks or beverages?

 

EB: I like to write in the mornings, when I'm closest to the dream state. Coffee is the beverage of choice, followed by seltzer with a squeeze of lemon. When I'm really deep into something, I eat at my desk, and I like to think of it as a kind of ant-free picnic.

 

BTC: Next year marks 25 years since your first novel was published. Has the writing process gotten any easier for you? Has the industry changed? 

 

EB: The best writing I do always happens when it feels joyful and easy. Whenever I struggle, it's a bad sign. So my writing style hasn't changed much, but the industry sure has. Random House took a chance on Durable Goods, a small, quiet, literary novel. I'm not sure that such a novel would be taken these days.

 

BTC: Were you always a reader? What was your favorite book as a child? 

 

EB: Yes, I always loved reading. Beautiful Joe, Black Beauty, and the Nancy Drew books were favorites. The summer after eighth grade, I read Gone With the Wind eight times! I also adored the Anderson and Grimm fairy tales, although they were instrumental in giving me false ideas about love and romance. I liked to read the stories in the ladies magazines and The Saturday Evening Post as well; it made me feel very sophisticated. I adored Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine and MAD magazine.

 

BTC: Can you give us a sneak peek at what’s you’re working on next? 

 

EB: After I finished Arthur, I really missed being in Mason. So the next book is a sequel to The Story of Arthur Truluv. It will be called Night of Miracles. You'll see Lucille, Maddy and Nola again, and meet some more people too.

 

Want to hear more from Elizabeth? She will be at the Carroll County Community College in Westminister on November 28 at 7 p.m. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear from one of today’s shining writers. And there will be cake!


 
 

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