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National Book Award Winners    

posted by: November 16, 2017 - 8:43am

Last night in New York City, four writers won the world’s most illustrious literary prize, the National Book Award. Jesmyn Ward's Sing, Unburied, Sing won for fiction, marking the second award for this talented author. Masha Gessen's The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia won the award for nonfiction. The poetry award went to Frank Bidart's Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016 and Robin Benway's Far from the Tree won for young people's literature. The ceremony was hosted by Cynthia Nixon and President Bill Clinton was a special presenter. 


In addition to a bronze medal and statue, each winner receives $10,000 along with the award, while each finalist gets $1,000 and a bronze medal of his or her own. The full list of finalists is here


Cover Art for Sing, Unburied, Sing Cover Art for The Future Is History Cover Art for Half-Light Cover Art for Far from the Tree


Rap Music

posted by: November 14, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover Art for Stoney The library has been collecting rap music for many years  but now it’s easier to find. The next time you visit your branch, look for our new CD RAP collection! We have almost 700 titles for you to check out, including these new ones on the Billboard Top Rap Charts.


If you want to both read and listen, here’s a selection of rap biographies and more from our collection.


Debut Cookbooks

posted by: November 8, 2017 - 6:00am

Cover Art for Bakehouse Cover art for Dining In Cover art for The Fearless Baker

Zingerman’s Bakehouse by Amy Eberling
To celebrate its 25th anniversary, Zingerman’s Bakery brings us 65 recipes. For the first time, bakers of all skill levels can try their hand at the bakery's famous Jewish rye and sour cream coffee cake. 


Dining In: Highly Cookable Recipes by Alison Roman
Roman, former editor at Bon Appétit who also has experience working in kitchens, shares her practical recipes. Each recipe is accompanied by a humorous story from Roman  the recipes are for everyone's cooking level, even the novice. 


The Fearless Baker: Simple Secrets for Baking Like a Pro by Erin Jeanne McDowell 
In her debut cookbook, McDowell, a columnist for Food52.Com, tries to make baking less daunting. The recipes range from simple brownies to the more difficult croissants and homemade puff pastry. Recipes are clear and easy to follow, with levels of difficulty ranging from easy, medium or hard assigned to each one.


This month's BCPL's Reading Challenge is read a book that won a National Book Award. Here are some of our suggestions. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. You can participate in BCPL's Reading Challenge on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #Bwellread to earn prizes at the end of each month!


 BCPL Reading Challenge 2017 In Partnership with WBALTV

Cover art for Age of Ambition Cover art for All the Pretty Horses Cover art for Behind the Beautiful Forevers  Cover art for Between the World and Me Cover art for The Color Purple Cover art for The Complete Stories Cover art for Faithful and Virtuous Night Cover art for Going After Cacciato Cover art for Gravity Rainbow Cover art for The Hemingses of Monticello Cover art for Invisible Man Cover art for Middle Passage Cover art for The Moviegoer Cover art for The Performance of Becoming Human Cover art for Salvage the Bones Cover art for The Shipping News Cover art for Sophie's Choice Cover art for Stamped from the Beginning Cover art for The Underground Railroad Cover art for The Unwinding Cover art for Voyages at the Sable Venus Cover art for Waiting Cover art for The Worst Hard Time Cover art for The Year of Magical Thinking


This month's BCPL's Reading Challenge is read a book that won a National Book Award. Here are some of our suggestions. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. You can participate in BCPL's Reading Challenge with the help of a parent or guardian on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #Bwellread to earn prizes at the end of each month!


 BCPL Reading Challenge 2017 In Partnership with WBALTV

Cover art for The Absolutely True Diary of a Part- Time Indian Cover art for Brown Girl Dreaming Cover art for Challenger Deep Cover art for Claudette Colvin Cover art for Doctor De Soto Cover art for Goblin Secrets Cover art for The Great Gilly Hopkins Cover art for Holes Cover art for Homeless Bird Cover art for The House of the Scorpion Cover art for M.C. Higgins the GreatCover art for Mockingbird Cover art for The Penderwicks Cover art for Ramona and Her Mother Cover art for A Swiftly Tilting Planet Cover art for The Thing About Luck Cover art for True Believer Cover art for What I Saw and How I Lied Cover art for Miss Rumphius Cover art for Noah's Ark Cover art for Outside Over There


Between the Covers with Nicole Blades

posted by: October 30, 2017 - 12:00pm

Cover art for Have You Met Nora?Nora Mackenzie has her dream job as a personal-fashion stylist and is about to marry the love of her life, whose family is one of New York City’s most powerful. But Nora has a secret that she's hidden from everyone — the fact that she is the biracial daughter of a Caribbean woman and a white man. Adopted and abused by her mother’s employer and sent to an exclusive boarding school to keep her quiet, Nora found that passing as a white woman could give her everything — until a former classmate returns to her life and wants revenge. With her wedding only days away, Nora must decide what lengths she will go to in order to maintain her secret. In Have You Met Nora?, Nicole Blades blends mystery, intrigue and romance in a fast-paced, tense story about identity, and I was thrilled to talk with her about her novel, her other writing experiences and her dream movie cast for this captivating novel.


Between the Covers:   Tell us a little bit about yourself.


Nicole Blades: I am a novelist and freelance journalist with 20 years’ experience working for magazines, newspapers and online publications. I started my journalism career at Essence magazine, worked as an editor at ESPN and Women’s Health and even co-founded an online magazine called SheNetworks during the early dot-com glory days. My freelance work has appeared in lots of different places, including The New York Times and Cosmopolitan. This past spring, I also launched a weekly podcast with my younger sister. It's called Hey, Sis!, and it's all about women’s stories on finding their focus and place in business, art, culture and life.


I'm also mom to a delightful 8-year-old boy, and I'm one of those crazy people you see running outdoors year round, even in those brick cold, winter mornings. And I really enjoying baking. More butter, that's what we all need in this life!


BTC: Did you always want to be a writer?


NB: When it comes to writing fiction, I’ve been doing that basically forever. I started putting my dreamed-up stories on paper back in the third grade. I was so fortunate to have a teacher, Mr. Harry Polka, who was a big supporter of creative writing. He encouraged me to write down my stories and to do it every day. It really made me believe that what I had to say, my stories and my voice, were interesting and important. I’ll always be grateful to him for that. But I didn't officially admit that I wanted to be a writer in a real sense until university. That's when I developed the confidence to finally say that writing was what I needed to pursue.


Author Nicole BladesBTC:  The title character in Have You Met Nora? is harboring a secret that she believes could topple her world. You do such a good job of bringing her inner turmoil to the page that I had knots in my stomach reading this novel. How challenging was it to bring such an internal, emotional character to the page? Was it a deliberate choice to make her unlikeable at times?

NB: Thank you, and sorry about the stressful reading! It's always a challenge trying to bring verisimilitude to a novel, but I think it's crucial. Things need to feel real, authentic, in order to keep the reader locked into the story and desperate to know more.


As for Nora being "unlikeable" at times, I definitely set out to investigate a protagonist who was complicated. I don't buy into the "unlikeable" tag that too many strong female protagonists often get pinned with simply because — if we're being honest — they are strong women. I think people are complex and flawed, and I'm interested in delving into those layers, especially when it comes to women's stories. A reader doesn't have to like what your protagonist does or support the choices the person makes, but if there's something real and relatable about the character’s behavior, it's intriguing enough to keep folks reading, to make them care about what happens next in your story. And ultimately, that is what turns pages, the lure of what happens next.


BTC:  Author Taylor Jenkins Reid said your novel is “a deft and searing commentary on identity and race.” Was this something you had in mind when you began writing the novel or did it develop throughout your writing process?


NB: Over the years I’ve definitely noticed definite threads running through all of my writing. I have always been drawn to stories about identity and the search for our best selves. I like stories that venture into the underneath, the “basement” of some of the things we all have to deal with as human beings in this life: complicated family dynamics; trying to pull the plug on a tangled relationship; feeling unsure of how to reconcile who you think you are with who you hope to be. These are the kinds of realistic, human stories that I find utterly compelling, so that's what I write about. And because I am a black woman born and raised in Canada, of Caribbean heritage, now living in the States, the subject of race is always present. It's part of my identity, so it will no doubt get folded into any story that I'm telling.


For this book, I didn't set out to make any statements or commentary. I was just fascinated by the concept of a person constructing an identity rooted in an incredible lie, taking “fake it ‘til you make it” to a totally different level. And then examining how far they would go to protect that identity that they’ve created out of nothing but dust and dreams.


BTC:  The story takes a turn when Dawn, Nora’s bitter former classmate, enters the picture. The mystery, scandal and intrigue are all developed so well and your pacing creates a gripping page-turner. What was most challenging about telling such a fast-moving story filled with secrets?


NB: The tricky part about pacing is...pacing. You want to make sure that you don't throw too many (potentially unnecessary) twists and turns into the story and wind up losing your reader a quarter of the way into things. You also want to make sure that you are constantly placing obstacles in the way of the protagonist getting what they want, meeting their need. Often that "need" is simple — love, belonging, acceptance — but overcoming the obstacles can't be easy. It's the actions that the protagonist then takes to try to prevail over the obstacles that keeps the story moving forward.  

BTC:  Have You Met Nora? is your third novel. Does the writing get easier? The inspiration come more quickly?


NB: I don't think writing ever gets easier. Anyone who tells you otherwise is trying to pull a fast one on you! For me, writing gets deeper. I have become more dedicated to the craft. I take writing seriously; it’s my vocation. And when I’m actively writing, I’m very focused on it. It might sound a little corny, but it's the truth: I feel very honored to be a part of the storytelling tradition. I often say that storytelling is the things that makes humans human. And I'm happy to be involved in that process.


As for inspiration, I wouldn't say it comes quicker the more novels I've been fortunate to write and have published. Instead, I've been finding inspiration in more everyday things, in "ordinary" stories of regular life. I'll let my curiosity guide me from there. Maybe it is coming to me a bit more quickly because as I get older, my eyes and heart seem to be more open and aware and ready to be inspired to learn more about a topic, person or experience.
BTC:  You are also a journalist on a wide-range of subjects. How does writing a novel differ from your writing as a journalist?


NB: First, it's all storytelling. Whether it's a fact-based, magazine story or something completely plucked from the back of your imagination, the stories have a lot in common in terms of conflict and characters and their needs and the obstacles blocking them. All of these kinds of stories are aiming to pass along information, traditions, history, and — I think most important — stories are trying to help us expand our understanding and widened out scope beyond our limited perspectives. We can only see the world through our own lens, our own POV, and stories — both in literature and journalism — allow us to break out of those limitations and see the other side of something, see it from another person's experience. That creates a deeper sense of compassion and empathy. Man, do we need a whole lot of that these days!


BTC: What can your readers expect next?


NB: What's next for me is, knock on wood, another novel. I'm working on a new book, hoping to finish it by the end of the year. I don't like to let the steam out of the pot on what I'm cooking, so I'll just say it's another story about a strong, complicated woman.

BTC:  You just got the call that Have You Met Nora? is being made into a movie and you have free reign with the casting. What’s your dream cast? Do you use celebrities as models for your characters when you’re writing?


NB: Goodness! Please put this out into the universe and make it real! Getting that call would be an absolute dream. Since I do use real people (often celebrities, but sometimes it's strangers on the street) as models for my characters, I have a folder on my desktop that is filled with photos of celebrities/magazine ad models who are "stand-ins" and help form the composites of what my made-up characters look like.


For example, Nora is a mix of a photo I saw of a younger Angelina Jolie with blonde hair and a model I spotted in a Vogue magazine ad. Fisher is a mix of soccer superstar David Beckham and actor Peter Hermann from the television show Younger. Basically, I have a subfolder of photos for every character, even Lady Eleanor, whom I envisioned as a Lee Radziwill type with some of the late NYC socialite Nan Kempner sprinkled on top for good measure.


BTC: Thanks so much for taking the time to talk to us. We're eagerly anticipating your next book!




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